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in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
who will protect it most? [twinkling] [tauntaun mewls] - unit four, what is it? over? - well, kid? - well, if you put it that way... - come in, unit four! what have you found? - nothing, sir. we just found some tremendous deals on cars nobody wants, that's all. barkley, out. - no! but obama wasn't really elected. don't you people care? - [choral singing] ♪ obama ♪ is president ♪ again captioning sponsored by comedy central from comedy central's world news headquarters in new york, this is the daily show with jon stewart. ( cheers and applause ) >> jon: welcome to the daily show. my name is jon stewart. the guest tonight, listen to this, settle down. supreme court justice, that's right, today on the show, supreme court... thank you very much -- supreme court justice sonnia sotomayor ( cheers and applause ) unless i believe she's coming out here. unless this is another elaborate hoax by manti te'o nemesis ronaiah tuiasosopo or as the germans refer to him (speaking nonsense). some of you may be surprised to see a supreme court justice here, one, because she is a sitting supreme
. if you listen to african american women talk about churches in the united states, you'll hear concerns. you will hear concerns from sisters in islam, a really wonderful group in malaysia talking how to reinterpret the koran so women's integrity is more full-fledged. so it's not really an answer to your question, but it does mean we have a much bigger agenda that if we take religion seriously is to watch a women engage with religion, both state and has organized process and what kind of gender analysis, what the gender analysis show you about the part is of a particular religion in particular places. i know from a serbian feminist friends that there is an enormous alarm now in the reassertion of the serbian orthodox christian church in serbian political life. there is also a lot of of armed amongst russian feminists about the closeness of the putin government to the russian orthodox church now. so you have to watch over time. you have to listen seriously to feminists in any country before you make a function. you have to be curious about how women live their religious lives or nonreligi
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
. remember when the two famously fumbled >> i will execute the office of president to the united states faithfully >> that i will execute the office... >> faithfully, the office of president of the united states >> the office of president of the united states faith fli sniem courteous, kind and forgiving. the president was nervous then. it's understandable. let's watch them do it again this time. while you're watching, imagine you're mitt romney >> that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states >> the office of president of the united states >> and will to the best of my ability. you know, romney is watching. i guarantee you it's one of the first times a devout mormon has ever used the fraiz, oh, [bleep]. of course mr. romney was not in attendance. there were stars aplenty. who better to spot them george stephanapolous. >> look at that crowd gathering now. morgan freeman, i think. right there on the capital steps. bill russell. i'm sorry. thank you, david remnick. >> jon: now. when george stephanapolous, in his defense, all tall people look alike to him. i s
ever bless the united states of america. [applause] >> the united states marine band. my country tis of thee sweet land of liberty if thee i sing land where my fathers died lad of the pilgrim's pride from every mountain side let freedom ring ♪ let music sweel the beach and ring from all the trees sweet freedom songs let silence break the sound prolonged ♪ our father guide to thee father of liberty to thee we sing ♪ long may our land be bright with freedom's holy light protect us by the might great god, our king ♪ >> pwow. our next distinguished guest is the appellate issue will share with us where -- poet who will share with us words he has composed for this location. occasion. >> one today. one sun rose on us today kindles over our shores greeting the facves of the great lakes acrossng a simple truth the greatplains rooftops, aking upf under each one a story told by oiur silten gestures my face, your face millions of faces each one yawning to life crescendoing to our day the pencil yellow school buses, for it stands, oranges betting our praise. sobered trucks and heavy with
. it provides opportunities for residents on either sides of the border. united states border, mexican border. when we provide that, things start falling into place. you see a reduction in crime, reduction in drug use. that's what this discussion today and we thank simon increasing for putting the fund is so important because it allows us to move forward and some of the things i think you heard and discussed, we need to increase or border infrastructure and implement a firm but fair immigration policy. we need to encourage more u.s. cities and mexican city partnerships to allow us to facilitate that trade discussed earlier. earlier in 2011, 2013, las cruces named the champion of change because we were able to show why in the southwest we've been able to increase profit and personnel in a tough and challenging time. during that time, we listened to many officials to me upon the best ration and the president said he wanted to increase trade with mexico. but that type of mandate and this type of forum, you'll see more and more trade with mexico. i appreciate you all coming out today. we eagerly
believed the supreme court's decision in citizens united was wrong, that we needed to know more disclosure of campaign contributions. yet a small minority of senators were able to prevent the bill from even being debated on the floor of the senate, let alone receiving an up-or-down vote. that's just one example. in the last two congresses, consider just some of the measures blocked by the minority, measures that received majority support on a cloture vote: the dream act, bring jobs home act, small business jobs and tax relief act, paying fair share act of 2012, repeal big oil tax subsidies act, teachers and first responders back-to-work act, american jobs act of 2011, public safety employer-employee cooperation act, paycheck fairness act, creating american jobs and ending offshoring act. now, again -- again, it's not that the bill was filibustered. the right to even debate these bills and vote on them was filibustered. one thing, he go on the bill and they filibuster. no, we couldn't even debate it. even though a majority of senators voted for cloture. not 60 but a majority. so the majorit
the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the united states government until may 19, 2013, and for other purposes. mr. reid: i would ask for a second reading but object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection is heard. the bill will be read for the second time on the next legislative day. mr. reid: mr. president, i now ask unanimous consent that the appointments at the desk appear separately in the record as if made by the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. reid: i now ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 2:00 p.m. on monday, january 28. that following the prayer and pledge, the morning business be deemed expired, the journal of proceedings be approved to date and the time for the two leaders be reserved for their use later in the day, and the senate proceed to a period of morning business until 4:30 p.m., that senators be permitted to speak during that period of time for up to ten minutes. further, following morning business, the senate proceed to h.r. 152 under the previous ord
to have details of the government's announcement. i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still going to give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. with three of your daily vegetable servings why take exercise so seriously,when it can be fun? push-ups or sprints? what's wrong with fetch? or chase? let's do this larry! ooh, i got it, i got it! (narrator) the calorie-smart nutrition in beneful healthy weight... includes grains and real chicken, because a healthy dog is a playful dog. beneful healthy weight. find us on facebook to help put more play in your day. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> venezuela's president will not be sworn in for a
of the united states and those of us that run the global companies obviously care very deeply about them. preserving the letter to nettie for comprehensive revenue neutral tax reform is a critical and very important to creating pro-growth tax law that will enable american companies to compete effectively against companies that are domicile in other countries around the world we need a level playing field. the united states has the highest corporate tax rate in the world. also the united states is one of the few countries in the world with a system that is called a global tax system rather than a territorial tax system. the 113th congress we are going to continue to advocate for comprehensive tax reform that broadens the base that reduces corporate tax rates and moves through a competitive territorial system. proctor and gamble pays income taxes and over 100 countries around the world. a business tax reform should provide a level playing field so that each business has the confidence of knowing it pays roughly the same amount of income tax as its competitors in markets with at home and ab
., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are -- the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 284 and -- the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 285 and the nays are 144. without objection, the bill is passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the house will come to order. the house will come to order. for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise? >> madam speaker, by direction of the democratic caucus, i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 42. resolved, that the following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the reading is suspended. without objection, the resolution is agreed to and the
to these questions, the american people deserve them, including why the president of the united states after alleging in a debate with mitt romney, said that he had called it a terrorist act when in fact he hadn't. in fact that same day he did an interview with cbs news saying he didn't know what happened. probably two weeks later, he told various news programs he didn't know what was the cause of it. we knew what the cause of it was. we knew that people don't bring r.p.g.'s and mortars to spontaneous demonstrations. so we -- smor us -- some of us will not give up on this despite what some in the media think we should do until we get all the answers. i was hanging on every word you were saying, john. i happened to glance at my apps, here's a bbc news reports. -- report. it says the u.n. says numbers of syrian refugees arriving in jordan putting a considerable strain on the resources. the u.n. h.c.r. said that more than 26,500 refugees have crossed into jordan since january 1. officials said up to 3,000 were arriving every day and 50,000 were waiting to cross. that happens to be the camp that we visit
in mind if they are very concentrated and very sedentary. 10% of all people in the united states on about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle-class, middle-age people in rural areas and hold onto their guns for a long time. on the other hand, most of the people engaging crying our teens and young adults in most criminal careers are short. one of things that means if there's a new generation of young people trying to solve the problem fresh and getting their hands on guns and one way you could take about the challenge here, the situation here is if you think about the united states being like a giant bathtub with 300 million guns, but nothing to worry about the entire town. just a few million guns changing hands every year and trying to divert them away from the high risk. the other thing i like to mention that the conversation right now is a bunch of stuff going on the federal level and a bunch of states to innovate on their own. one of the things important to keep in mind the slow side from hawaii, no state is an island. every state is doing on the gun regulations that is relevant in
extraordinary work both in the united states senate, somebody who served this country with valor in vietnam. this is somebody who is currently serving on my intelligence advisory board and doing an outstanding job. so i haven't made a decision on this. with respect to the particular comment you quoted he apologized for it. >> the president there is referring to anti-gay remarks hagel made in the past, remarks that this ad in the "new york times" points out. the ad from the log cabin republicans also mentions other criticisms of hagel. he has opposed sanctions against iran and some say he has been less than emphatic about his support for israel. >>> the economy is ending 2012 on the positive side. december's jobs report is out and is showing more than 1.8 million jobs were added last year. 155,000 of those jobs were added last month. while unemployment remained flat at 7.8%. >>> we solved the fiscal cliff. now the capitol hill confrontations over the debt ceiling are expected to get as intense if not worse. the debt ceiling is the legal limit on the nation's borrowing. in his weekly address
on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during the obama administration, 1.5 million. for the entirity of the bush administration, two terms in office, we saw about two million deportations. and then in 2012 alone, nearly -- more than, rather, 400,000 immigrants deported, which is a record high. our next phone call is from mark in new jersey, republican. hi, mark. caller: good morning. i'm also a municipal chair here for the republican committee. i'm al
and even here in the united states. we could have passed it last year. he we had republicans and democrats -- we had republicans and democrats, not a single senator blocked that passage. i hope we canover come the obstruction. this is a blight on the world community. it's a blight on the united states. we should be taking steps to stop it. we also have to in the judiciary committee continue to exercise oversight when it comes to our nation's counterterrorism efforts to protect the civil liberties of all americans. we'll examine the constitutional and legal issues implicated by the administration's use of droughns abroad. my concern goes beyond the legal force used against suspected terrorists. i am concerned about the growing use of drones by federal and local authorities to spy on americans here at home. this vast emerging technology is cheap, but i think just because it's available doesn't even it helps us. i think there could be a significant threat to the privacy and civil liberties of millions of americans. so just because we have the technology that allows us to spy on each other, le
president of the united states tweeted out this picture. this picture. this is the final meeting that we know vice president biden took in washington. part of his big high profile effort to put together proposals for policy reform after the newtown elementary school massacre last month. there is a lot going on in this photo. the vice president is there obviously in shirt-sleeves on the right side of your screen. immediately to his right, wearing glasses there, that of course is secretary of homeland security janet napolitano. the white house just announced today that she will be staying on for a second term. now the department of homeland security is not old enough that there are traditions yet as to how long people stay on once they have the secretary job. but this be the first time that somebody has kept the gig for two terms, if secretary napolitano stays throughout the president's term in office. of course, to become homeland security secretary in the first place, janet napolitano had to step down from her old job, which was being governor of arizona. we just passed the two-year anni
're getting united and saying we are going to do this. from the political side, we elected these people. we had a huge turnout in arizona, a door-to-door -- the turnout was more than ever before. not only is it from the after the side of having these visuals, but it is from the organizing side that we have the vote as well. >> thank you all for being with us from phoenix grid jose, especially, you are 11 years old, that you fought so hard for your dad to be freed, senior on all of the television networks, you are very great -- seeing you on all of the television networks, you are very brave. thank you so much for being with us. we will continue this discussion about immigration when we come back. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with juan gonzalez. we continue to look at immigration now, as we turn to news this week that president obama will kick off a second term with a major push for comprehensive immigration reform. obama made the announcement during a speech tuesday in nevada, a battleground states w
platform in the united states. >> host: and the technology aspect of that is? >> guest: technology aspect is manifold. and price performance improves every 18-24 mocks. in the last year we have gotten into the innovation cycle in batteries so by the end of 2020 electric vehicles will actually be price competitive with grass-driven cars. the problem with these things is that we can't wait. we can't wait because of the environmental effects and we can't wait because we need the economy to grow quickly right now. so the book lays out a whole bunch of different ideas for bringing private investment much more quickly into the job of rebuilding the power grid. >> host: on this show, a series on the international power plant, and he doesn't necessarily agree that the internet is completely green or is terribly green. what is your thought? >> guest: he is right about that. people say that data centers in the united states account for 2% of all electricity consumption. if it isn't exactly that number it certainly is the biggest single new element of demand in the whole electricity area. and where
to the united nations a treaty that extends the right to bear arms as a human right for every person on the planet. by the end of my second term -- [ applause ] we will have the first permanent base on the moon an it will be american. >> that last inspired us to do the following for which i will be eternally grateful. greatings from the year 2019. obviously, i'm on the moon where newt gingrich is the president of the moon. how can anybody be president of the moon you ask from the past where you live. back when he was just candidate gingrich, president newt not only promised a permanent colony on the moon but the end of the second term but he delayed would be an american colony. he said once he figured out how to get a few thousand americans up here, the moon could then become the 51st state. don't you miss the news when newt gingrich was the front-runner for the republican nomination. that happened in our lifetimes america. he was running first. you think mitt romney will inspire anybody to wear a space costume on a news show. will mitt romney ever reveal his true self via ring tone.
and lesbians and issues important to the lgtb community. the president of the united states is always had the right to appoint people that he's comfortable with. he won the election. the test for confirmation should be is there any major disqualification. there isn't any. there's confusion about his record. i heard our previous panelists say he's got a problem on israel. he doesn't have a problem on israel. he's devoted to give israel $38 billion in aid over his career in the senate. he's been a strong supporter of israel. in terms of iran, he was against unilateral sanctions but strongly for and has supported multilateral sanctions, the type that are really starting to have an effect. let's take a deep breath and listen to the secretary hagel as he answers tough questions and he'll do great and he'll be confirmed. >> as we look at the second term of the president, this is the legacy term to cement what he's done already in the next four years. one thing that we have for david brooks, why hagel was picked. referencing the long game of this. chuck hagel has been nominated to supervise the
these issues. i know that the united kingdom is sometimes seen as an argumentative and rather strong-minded member of the family of european nations. and it is true that our geography has shaped our psychology. we have the character of an island nation. we are independent, forthright, passionate in defense of our sovereignty. we can no more change this british sensibility than we can train the english channel. and because of this sensibility, we come to the european union with a frame of mind that is more practical than emotional. for us, the european union is the means to an end. prosperity, stability, the anchor of freedom and democracy both within europe and beyond her shores, not an end in itself. we insistently ask how, why, to what end? but this doesn't make us somehow un-european. the fact is that ours is not just an island story. it is also a continental story. for all our connections with the rest of the world, for which we are mightily proud, we have always been a european power and we always will be. from caesar's legion to the napoleonic wars, from the reformation, the en
law or regulation created by an executive order, which is contrary to the constitution of the united states of america and what it says shall be deemed as unlawful and shall not be carried out by myself or my office. an officer of the law refusing to carry out the law. interesting. well, joining me now is that arizona sheriff, paul babu. sheriff, thank you first of all for being here tonight. >> it's my pleasure, reverend al. now you'll defie the law if it violates the constitution, but what gives you the authority to decide if it does that? >> well, my oath and that i'm the top law enforcement officer of my county. and where we're talking here, and this is what i put in parenthesis, that letter or law that circumvents the ledge slative process. the last time i checked, we live in a republic with democratic principles and you can't just write and sign an executive order, especially in matters of constitutional consequences and infringe upon the rights -- >> but the president ocht united states is in power to give executive orders. like he did today. that's not unconstitutional. my qu
and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral. see why millions of people have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp. don't wait. call now. >>> hi, everyone. oi'm tamron hall. following breaking news. in about 30 minutes a bipartisan group of senators will lay out a framework for what could lead to comprehensive immigration reform by the end of this year. chuck schumer, john mccain, dick durbin, marco rubio and bob menendez will discuss the plan. we'll bring it to you live. our first read team notes this is the first time senator mccain signed on to a priority of president obama. he takes the vision on the road to las
of the united states, a lawyer, a doctor, and they want the best education, the best type of food, a safe and affordable home to live. the women we work with are investing so much into their children. they are having to trade off paying for rent and paying for food, and trade off for whether they keep the lights on and pay for food. that is unconscionable. [applause] thank you. all of us can expect more. low income women should be included in the national dialogue. the women i have spoken with our genius. -- are genius. they are brilliant to survive in the united states today. they are so fantastic entrepreneurs. they are wise. they have a lot of grit. they are stronger than any of us on stage. it is a brain trust in america we are not utilizing. they should be part of the national dialogue at a part of the stage and being listened to in congress. not just the special interest lobbyists. [applause] >> we are going into the last hour of the program. we want to highlight the fight back. there are people in this country who are succeeding against the odds every day as they struggle with pove
san obama, do solemnly swear, that i will execute the office of the president of the united states faithfully. >> when chief justice john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say "i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. " barack obama stopped and paused and smiled as if to say, come on, man, this is my big day. you have to get this right. unfortunately, he did not get it right so the very next night in the white house, they did it again. this time roberts used notes which he had not used the first time and they got it right. >> we walk for the history of democracy's big day monday at 8:00 a.m. and again at 8:00 p.m. eastern. this is part of a three-day holiday weekend on c-span 2's book-tv. >> the greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker. this honor now beckons america, the chance to lead the world at last out of the valley of turmoil and onto that high ground of peace that man has dreamed of since the dawn of civilization >> must embark on new progra
. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, three years have past since the supreme court's dreadful citizens united decision, and we have seen the dramatic increase in the amount of corporate money flowing into our elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the
reported the tax increase actually affected all three quarters of the united states. now we are learning it has affected so many middle class americans that consumer confidence is slipping. fox business network elizabeth mcdonald is here. >> this comes from the conference board consumer index. it's a really important index. the federal reserve tracks it economists on wall street track it. it did take a sharp drop in january. all of the positive gains in the index in 2012. what the top officials are saying is that consumers are more pessimistic about their financial situation and they are attributing it to the hike in the payroll tax. it has undoubtedly dampened consumer spirits us. the payroll tax was reinstated recently. what the board is saying is it may take a while for confidence to rebound. the conference board for consumer confidence is one of the leading economic indicators. the confidence drop comes despite the improvement in the housing market despite the fact that auto sales annual high of 14 and a half million since the financial crisis and stops near all time highs as well. i
of the president of the united states. but as president obama said yesterday, some people will use these measures to make gun owners fearful. >> even the slightest hint of some sensible, responsible legislation in this area fans this notion that somehow here it comes. and that everybody's guns are going to be taken away. >> when it comes to executive , president obama is hardly a tyrant. this president has issued the fewest executive orders of any president in over a century. there will be no executive order on the second amendment. this hasn't stopped the obama haters from ramping up their resistance. tea party senator rand paul is driving the campaign of fear. >> i'm against having a king. i think having a monarch is what we fought the american revolution over. and someone who wants to bypass the constitution, bypass congress, that's someone who wants to act like a king or a monarch. i've been opposed to executive orders even with republican president. but one that wants to infringe on the second amendment, we will fight tooth and nail. and i promise you there will be no rock left unturned as f
to american spehr convenience abroad. he's i think very skeptical that the united states, when it exercises its force abroad, is doing the right thing, is helping the good. >> you can say that about a man who volunteered to go to vietnam? >> i don't think that's a relevant issue. i think it's quite noble and honorable that he did so. i think if you asked his friend, say, senator mccain, who also went to vietnam and suffered quite horribly, they have a different view about the exercise. >> fair enough. about american power. ifill: do you think that that vietnam experience and how it has influenced whatever his thinking is today is a good thing or a bad thing? >> i would say in senator hagel's case it has been a profound... it has had a profound impact on him. he's the first generation of what you might call the vietnam syndrome. he's scared of the use of force abroad. i would just suggest that since world war ii i think the order that we have known, the prosperous more or less peaceful order that we have known as been because of the exercise of american power abroad. i think senator hagel wa
is 15 times that of other wealthy nations. in 2008 japan had 11 people killed with guns. the united states had 12,000. in 2012 the entire united kingdom population of 64 million had 35 gun deaths. the city of chicago alone had 500. how can mr. lapierre be right when he says the only answer to the exponential rate of firearm homicides in this country is more firearms? >> look at the rate of gun homicides in states like texas where gun control is not a factor and people can carry concealed weapons. the rate is very low. you look at cities -- you made my point. >> i don't think i have, sir. we think of aurora, colorado, we think of the oregon shopping mall shooting. but you were going to -- >> i was -- >> one minute, mr. ward. >> fortunately, we live in a world where there is such a thing as math and statistics and the statistics have shown quite clearly, the highest rate of gun deaths in the country would be louisiana. louisiana also happens to have the least gun regulations. illinois, where chicago sits and people love to cite chicago, chicago is a city where they have a myriad of pr
certain countries, the desperately poor and people who could most use coming to the united states have a hard time coming in. immigration is easy for people like me. if you have a ph.d. and are highly educated, you get job offers from prestigious places, it is easy for you to move. australia has a system. if you have an mba, you get 100 points and can move to australia. libertarians think where you live is something like an accident of birth it has a major effect on your life prospect. because you are born on one side of the border, you will be desperately poor. the same person born on the other side of the border will have a rich life. they are otherwise identical. it is very inefficient. economists try to estimate what are the effects of restrictive immigration. they tend to view that that is the most inefficient policy we have. when they try to estimate the dead weight losses, they think it is 50% to 100%. 100% is the average. >> dead weight loss? >> it is a technical thing. if you draw a supply and demand curve. what is the lost wealth, the wealth not created because we had a bad p
the committee on the part of the senate to notify the president of the united states that a quorum of each house has been assembled and that congress is ready to receive any communication that he may be pleased to make. the gentleman from virginia, mr. cantor, and the gentlewoman from california, ms. pelosi. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington rise? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: mr. speaker, by direction on the republican conference, i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 6, resolved that following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees of the house of representatives. committee on agriculture, mr. lucas, chairman. committee on appropriations, mr. rogers of kentucky, chairman. committee on armed services -- mrs. mcmorris rodgers: mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that the resolution be considered as read and printed in the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the reading is dispensed with. without objection
the benefit of the united states guarantee on their performance. they live or die by the fact whether you pay your mortgage or you don't. because of that, those securities, by the way, trade at markets. they do not trade as far. they reflect the fact that there are huge problems in that community. i brought one slide, and right now's a perfect time to put the slide up. so just to frame this, to frame this, so i can see it here, that's okay. um, this is one, an adaptation from one page in fannie mae's third quarter 10q. so this is the united states government's view of the plf sector. this is with respect to that portion of the bonds that they own. longer discussion of why frank may owns any of these bonds at all, but they do own some of those bonds. and they now tell us what they think about the underlying mortgages. and these are the numbers you want to look at. fannie mae says that there's about $28 billion on their balance sheet, exposure to mortgages, in this sector. they expect a 50% default rate. this isn't before, this is going forward on their existing holdings, 50% default rate. and
summer, maybe. the developments across north africa have huge implications for the united states. to give you one example -- any time you had areas where there is no rule of law and where there is no government, you have a place where al qaeda or al qaeda type affiliate's can take root. as we have those places, they feed things -- they see things. they see plots, they contemplate plot against the united states. just because they have not had a major terrorist attack in the homeland in the last few years does not mean that we can seal ourselves off from the rest of such an attack. we live in a world where what happened in north africa and country that people may not have even heard of before really can have a direct impact, whether you live in washington, d.c., los angeles or any place in between. >> we also have homegrown terrorists and so called lone wolves. when we are dealing with american citizens inside our country, there is a different rate that applies. our constitution and our fourth amendment. aseptic that where that line is between freedom of expression, protected by our first a
time to examine those in detail. we haven't used the process that is in place here in the united states senate to go through committees and let the committees work through, is this essential to meeting the emergency needs? or can we set this aside and spend a little more time examining it, looking at it to make sure that this is how we want to go forward? we have a habit here of throwing money at things under an emergency category and then later finding out that, one, it wasn't an emergency where the money went. and, number two, it was misspent and not effective. we simply can't afford to keep doing this. once again i want to state we're not here trying to undermine funding for sandy, needed for sandy. some of the things the house did i think are legitimate in terms of saying let's set aside unrelated matters. it doesn't mean we cast them into the dust bin never to be seen again. it simply means let's let those that are not emergency situations be more carefully examined in terms of whether we need that. and if someone does come to the floor, as senator lee is going to do, is my underst
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